BetterTextAds.com HOW TO DRAW: July 2007

Saturday, July 28, 2007

Why Every Artist Needs a Blog and How to Create an Artist Blog

As an artist, the key to selling more artwork is maximizing its exposure. The internet is an increasingly popular tool for promoting original art, and if done properly, can be quite profitable.

One of the most effective (and free!) online marketing tools for artists is the blog. Artist blogs provide an easy way to display your art, discuss your creative process, post exhibition announcements and more. Best of all, blogs require no working knowledge of HTML and the search engines love their dynamic content.


Click here to get The Blog Profits Blueprint


How to Become A Professional Artist and Get Paid for Drawing.

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Figure Drawing Secrets. How To Draw Figures And People For Any Artists.

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Art Lessons - How To Draw Faces, Paint Realistically, And Do Calligraphy - Presented By Bennecelli, The Acclaimed Artist!

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What is a blog and how will it sell my art?

A "blog" is a web-based diary or journal. The author of a blog, also known as a "Blogger", publishes content on a regular basis about a focused topic. These regular postings typically provide a "community" feel by allowing site visitors to post feedback to your journal entries. This mode of communication can deepen relationships with potential art buyers, leading to increased sales.

Blogs also have the ability to archive all of your previous posts, dynamically creating an individual page for each journal entry. The feature is great for art buyers using search engines to find original art. For example, if you have a blog post describing a painting that you just completed of the Golden Gate Bridge at sunset and an art buyer in Florida goes to Google and searches for "painting of Golden Gate Bridge at sunset", there is a very good chance that your blog entry will appear pretty high in the rankings. Cha Ching!!

Many artists have felt the pain of email marketing losing its effect due to spam filters, junk email overloads and virus paranoia. Blogs provide a new way to communicate with clients, fans and industry professionals. This trend can support your email marketing efforts by allowing blog subscription options for site visitors so that they are notified whenever your blog is updated along with providing a permanent place on the web for all of your postings as opposed to newsletter emails that are typically deleted.

How to start a blog

Blog Publishing Tools

To begin, visit some of these free blogging sites, all offering unique template options that even an artist can appreciate, image uploads and syndication ability.

Blogger.com (Simple to set up and multiple authoring ability) MSN Spaces (Create your own mini site, with an exceptional blogging feature) Live Journal (Requires a bit of ‘blogging knowledge' to get it set up) Blog Drive

If you're interesting in reviewing additional blog features, these sites require a small monthly fee to maintain.

Typepad (starts at $4.95/month)

Tripod Blogs (starts at $4.95/month)

Note to artists with MySpace accounts: MySpace provides members personal blogs, but it is important to know that MySpace blogs are not currently listed in search engines, which as noted above, is one of the main reasons to get a blog. While MySpace works to remedy this issue, it is recommended that you blog using a tool that is accessible to search engine spiders.

Decide on a title for your blog

The title of your blog should be brief and to the point. You can get creative with your language in the blog description / tag line. A focused title will help with higher search engine rankings and make it clear to visitors what the blog is about.

For example, the title for ThePauper.com blog is "Diary of a Pauper". The blog description is "Rants and raves about the careers and lives of starving artists." The title is concise, stating exactly what it is, while the description is a bit more creative.

Blog theme

It's important to establish yourself as a professional working artist if you want to use your blog as a vehicle to sell your art. Blog theme involves the layout and color of the page, quality of the artwork images displayed and verbiage used for blog postings. Select your blog template carefully and make a habit to review your blog from the perspective of a potential client. Is the page visually appealing? Do the images of your artwork provide a link to an extra large version to see detail? Does your content have a consistent theme? Here's a good example of a working blog by mix engineer, Ken Lewis: http://protoolsmixing. com/blog.html The content theme is exceptionally consistent, plus the colors and page layout match his website.

What to write

What's beautiful about blogs is that there are no rules on what to write, but if you want to attract and keep an audience, you might consider some of these suggestions.

Keep your posts creative and interesting. Move and inspire your readers by being completely honest about your creative process.

Use keywords in your blog title and post. Using the example mentioned earlier - if your post is about a Golden Gate Bridge painting, be sure to use that exact phrase in the title and body of your blog. Think about what people might type into search engines to find your content and then use those keywords in your blog. This technique will help increase the ranking of your web page on search engines.

Post daily, or at least twice a week. If you publish blog entries frequently, you will see more return visitors, subscriptions to your blog and comments from site visitors.

Proofread and preview your blog entries before posting. Some blog HTML editors have a way of creating weird symbols out of certain characters and a quick spell-check never hurts. (Note: be sure to create your blog entries using Word or some other text editor. Many blogging tools tend to "time out" after a certain amount of time and you could potentially lose hours of work.)

Publish your blog Finally! Your blog looks great and has unique content. Now, depending on the blogging tool that you selected, follow the steps to publish it to the World Wide Web. Test the live URL that now houses your blog. If all of your graphics appear correctly and the copy is flawless, then you want to make sure that you promote your blog on your personal website, in your email signature and by word of mouth.

Using the tools you already have to spread the word while testing your dedication to frequent posting is the best way to get started. Part 2 of will unveil tons of ways to promote your blog online



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Caricature Drawing and a Better Retirement


What began as a hobby has become a full-time obsession. I refuse to
refer to drawing as a "job", that would defeat the original purose
of what I do. It began as a search for some part-time way of
augmenting Social Security. I needed enough additional
income to keep the wolves away and facilitate my being
able to focus exclusively on art; the fullfillment of
a life-long dream.

For the past three years I have been making the
transition from my previous life as a mental health
counselor to that of a semi-retired caricature artist.
It has been one heck of a trip, but well worth the
time and effort.

I feel very comfortable saying to one and all that
I have now made it to where I had always wished and
hoped I could someday be. My list of art clients
numbers into many hundreds and include not only orders
from nearly every State in the Union, but also from a
dozen foreign countries as well. I have divested myself
of the stressful routine of being a full-time counselor,
working in a busy community-based mental health facility.
There are no more staff meetings, schedules or mountains
of paperwork to deal with. I now spend my days at home in
my studio,listening to vintage rock'n roll music and
creating caricatures from photos people send me.
I'm not getting rich, but I am comfortable and, more importantly,
much more at ease with myself and the world. I have succeeded
in making retirement a truly "golden" experience that has rejuvenated
my spirit and replentished my hope for the future.

I strongly encourage anyone who is comtemplating what to do with themselves in their later years, those who do not necessarily see themselves fishing or playing golf until they're planted, to consider a similar course. Turn your hobby or latent passion into a means to a happier, more productive retirement.For me, it was art and caricature drawing. Whatever it is you've always wished you could do, remember: If not now, when?


Click here to get The Blog Profits Blueprint


How to Become A Professional Artist and Get Paid for Drawing.

Click Here!

Figure Drawing Secrets. How To Draw Figures And People For Any Artists.

Click Here!

Art Lessons - How To Draw Faces, Paint Realistically, And Do Calligraphy - Presented By Bennecelli, The Acclaimed Artist!

Click Here!

http://www.articlesbase.com/art-articles/caricature-drawing-and-a-better-retirement-162403.html

Flipstart Micro Laptop Drawing Close to Release

After years in development, the FlipStart 1.0 is nearing its debut. This will be a computer so small that it might tempt those who need more functionality that a handheld or smartphone can offer but don’t want to carry around a full-size laptop.

This device will have the typical clamshell shape of a laptop, but will be 5.9 inches wide, 4.5 inches tall, and 1.6 inches thick and weigh just 1.8 pounds (with extended battery). It will be bigger and heaver than some of its competition, like the Sony Vaio UX180P or OQO’s model 02, but has a larger screen and keyboard.


Click here to get The Blog Profits Blueprint


How to Become A Professional Artist and Get Paid for Drawing.

Click Here!

Figure Drawing Secrets. How To Draw Figures And People For Any Artists.

Click Here!

Art Lessons - How To Draw Faces, Paint Realistically, And Do Calligraphy - Presented By Bennecelli, The Acclaimed Artist!

Click Here!


In addition to its 5.6-inch, SVGA primary display, it will have a 1.9-inch external screen that can show information from Microsoft Outlook, including the user’s email, calendar, and contacts.

The FlipStart 1.0 will use a 1.1 GHz Intel Pentium M processor to run Windows XP Professional, and Windows Vista Business will be available as an option. It will also sport an Intel Graphics Media Accelerator.

This PC will have 512 MB of RAM and a 30 GB hard drive.

For wireless connectivity, it will include Wi-Fi b/g, Bluetooth and the 3G cellular-wireless standard EV-DO.

It will also have two USB 2.0 ports, an Ethernet port, and a VGA port.

The FlipStart 1.0 is scheduled for release later this month, and it is expected to cost $2,000. More information is available on the FlipStart Labs web site.
http://www.articlesbase.com/online-promotion-articles/flipstart-micro-laptop-drawing-close-to-release-122307.html

Saturday, July 14, 2007

Types Of Drawing Charcoal

When it comes to drawing and sketching there are many instruments that you can use to get your imagination onto a sheet of paper. One of the most commonly used mediums by artists is the drawing charcoal. Drawing charcoal is easily accessible, can create the lightest of grays to the rich darkest of blacks and is very easy to work with. Its popularly seems to be steadily growing over the years as more and more artists realize its unique quality to enhance the visual presentation of many of their sketches and drawings. Compared to that of the pencil, drawing charcoal is arguably more visually stimulating. Plus people will tend to take you more seriously as an artist, since drawing charcoal is used by some of the most renowned artists from all over the world.


Click here to get The Blog Profits Blueprint


How to Become A Professional Artist and Get Paid for Drawing.

Click Here!

Figure Drawing Secrets. How To Draw Figures And People For Any Artists.

Click Here!

Art Lessons - How To Draw Faces, Paint Realistically, And Do Calligraphy - Presented By Bennecelli, The Acclaimed Artist!

Click Here!


Before using drawing charcoal for your artistic endeavors, you must be aware that there are a few different types of charcoals to choose from. The first is the drawing charcoal pencil. The drawing charcoal pencil is merely tightly compressed pieces of charcoal wrapped in a plastic or a timber like material. Charcoal can be flaky and powdery, so if you decide to use a charcoal pencil without its plastic or timber like wrappings, you may end up with dirty hands.

The charcoal pencil is also very easy to sharpen, which is very important for the finest details of your drawings. Another of type of drawing charcoal is the Willow and vine charcoal. The Willow and vine charcoal is generally unwrapped and can produce shades from pale gray to a deep black. This utensil is great for the everyday sketches. One of the most noticeable traits of the Willow and vine charcoal is that it tends to smudge. Hard charcoal is a strong, tough sketching tool used primarily for extremely fine lines. You may be want to use hard charcoal on strong, thick paper. Charcoal is general is very affordable. So the try them all out until you find the on that fits your needs the best.

If you would like to get earn serious income online from your sketches and drawings visit: http://www.thestephansmith.com/GetPaidToDraw.html

Drawing inspiration

New comic book celebrates feats of Langley-based team

Gary Kingston
Vancouver Sun


Click here to get The Blog Profits Blueprint


How to Become A Professional Artist and Get Paid for Drawing.

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Figure Drawing Secrets. How To Draw Figures And People For Any Artists.

Click Here!

Art Lessons - How To Draw Faces, Paint Realistically, And Do Calligraphy - Presented By Bennecelli, The Acclaimed Artist!

Click Here!


As comic book superheroes, Svein Tuft and the rest of the pro cyclists with the Langley-based Symmetrics team had to be drawn a bit larger than life.

Still, when Tuft saw himself in the new comic/press kit looking more muscular than your typical lean, lithe road racer, he had to laugh.

"We're all a bunch of sissies really," he cracked.

Hardly. Sissies don't win the inaugural U.S. Open in Virginia, as the 30-year-old Tuft did on NBC in April. Nor do they lead the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) Americas point standings as Tuft currently does, a standing that could well help get Canada three spots in the men's road race at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Tuft and the rest of the Symmetrics team are taking a break from UCI racing to return home for B.C. Superweek, the eight-races-in-10-days extravaganza that starts tonight with the Tour de White Rock's hill climb and includes four criterium, including Wednesday's Tour de Gastown and two road races.

It will be during Superweek that Symmetrics will give wide distribution to the unique comic book, believed to be a first for a pro cycling team. The idea came about earlier this spring when Symmetrics public relations man, Matt Hansen, editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics DB Pro line, and Symmetrics boss Kevin Cunningham were kicking around ideas about how to promote the five-year-old team.

"We needed a paper press kit, but those things are just so boring, so lame," said Hansen. "We said let's make something fresh, something that essentially tells a story, points out our sponsors, our values and what the team is all about."

The result is a 16-page kid friendly comic, whose story line involves three team riders -- Tuft, Andrew Pinfold and Andrew Randell -- being late to a photo shoot and sees them riding their Norco bikes and eating Power Bars -- both team sponsors -- while riding by the buildings of other sponsors, including major backer Coast Capital Savings.

The 15,000 copies will be distributed at all Superweek events, at select bike stores in the Lower Mainland and at Coast Capital offices.

"It's real first class," says Cunningham, who admits some people were skeptical at first.

"When we talked to all our sponsors and told them we had this idea, it was like we had come from another planet. But when they saw it, they all thought it was cool.

"One of our goals is to take our team brand and not just have the cycling community know who we are, but get our brand out in the general public. We're an all-Canadian team that is trying to produce the very best Canadian athletes, trying to produce Olympic athletes."

The terrific art work was pencilled by Brazilian Eduardo, who Hansen says is a big sports fan and who loved drawing cyclists for the first time.

In addition to the story line, the book contains biographical information on all the riders.

"I was skeptical at first, but the more I thought about it, I thought it was a really good idea, especially for kids," said Tuft. "It's something that really works at their level and our sport needs so much more exposure as far as families getting involved."

Cam Evans, the Tsawwassen resident who won the national road racing championship in Quebec on Wednesday and who will be out to defend his Tour de White Rock hill climb title tonight, says he loves the look of the comic. "Maybe for the next one, I can be part of the story line."

With all the negatives surrounding cycling the last couple of years because of the Tour de France doping scandals, the Symmetrics people feel the comic will help paint the sport in a more positive light and create, for kids in particular, some role models.

"These guys are superheroes at the end of the day," says Hansen. "In his civvies, Svein Tuft is just a regular dude, a Peter Parker [Spider-Man] if you will. But when he puts the racing suit on, he becomes this extraordinary person, a role model with extraordinary powers."

gkingston@png.canwest.com
http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/news/sports/story.html?id=cefb7c33-18bf-41f2-974c-1053ab677aed

National Drawing and Coloring Contest Launches to Help Raise Awareness for Pediatric GERD

Third Annual Kids Create. Parents Relate. National Drawing and Coloring Contest Launches to Help Raise Awareness for Pediatric GERD



Contest Winners will be Awarded Educational Scholarships and Art Supplies

LAKE FOREST, Ill., July 13 /PRNewswire/ -- Sometimes pictures really do
speak a thousand words, especially when it comes to children. It can be
difficult for some children to describe in words how they feel, but through
drawing and artwork they may be able to show their parents how they feel.
The third annual Kids Create. Parents Relate. National Drawing and Coloring
Contest for Tummy Aches is based on the idea that it may be easier for kids
to communicate how they feel through drawing rather than words. The contest
invites children to draw or color how they feel when experiencing frequent
stomachaches or other possible symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease
(GERD).
Prevacid(R) (lansoprazole) and the Pediatric Adolescent
Gastroesophageal Reflux Association (PAGER) created the Kids Create.
Parents Relate. National Drawing and Coloring Contest in 2005 to help
educate parents and healthcare professionals about pediatric GERD and to
help children communicate health issues to their parents.
"It can be difficult for many parents to recognize the symptoms of
pediatric GERD," said pediatric gastroenterologist Suzanne P. Nelson, M.D.,
M.P.H. of Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. "The Kids
Create. Parents Relate. National Drawing and Coloring Contest gives
parents, children and healthcare providers a tool to help facilitate
communication about pediatric GERD. Raising awareness about the symptoms of
pediatric GERD, a common yet frequently overlooked condition in children,
is extremely important."
The Kids Create. Parents Relate. National Drawing and Coloring Contest
entry forms are available to download by visiting http://www.prevakids.com.
Children will have the opportunity to submit their original drawings that
depict their experience with pediatric GERD. The deadline for entry is
September 25, 2007. In addition to the educational prizes, the 12 winners'
artwork will also be featured in the Kids Create. Parents Relate. calendar
and included on http://www.prevakids.com through 2008.
Since the contest launched in 2005, more than 700 children have
submitted original paintings, sketches and drawings that embodied their
physical symptoms of pediatric GERD. Sixteen children were awarded more
than $70,000 in educational scholarships and art supplies for their school
or non profit organization of their choice.
There are many causes of stomachaches; sometimes they are not serious
and sometimes they are. The most frequent symptom of pediatric GERD is
stomachache, and its physical symptoms can be very painful. It can occur
when there is a weakness in the lower esophageal sphincter, allowing
stomach acid to flow up into the esophagus. Other symptoms can include
nausea and vomiting, belching, wheezing, difficulty swallowing, heartburn
and weight loss. If you think your child might have GERD, speak with his or
her physician. Only a doctor can diagnose pediatric GERD and determine what
treatments are best.
This year, 12 winners will be chosen from two age categories (six from
age three to nine and six from age 10 to 15). Two first-place winners will
receive a $10,000 educational scholarship and $1,500 in art supplies
donated to the school or non profit organization of his or her choice. Two
second-place winners will receive a $2,500 educational scholarship and
$1,000 in art supplies. Two third-place winners will receive a $1,000
educational scholarship and $500 in art supplies. Six participants will
receive honorable mentions, three from each age group, and will each
receive a $500 educational scholarship and $250 in art supplies.
"The response from children and parents over the past two years has
been wonderful, and we expect to get an even greater response this year,"
said Beth Anderson, director for the PAGER Association. "We found that
parents really appreciate the opportunity to communicate with their
children about their symptoms; and children like being able to express
themselves artistically. We are very excited to build upon the success of
this program by continuing our partnership with Prevacid."

Sunday, July 8, 2007

Drawing Tips - Top 10 Mistakes Beginners Make

Common Drawing Errors and How to Fix Them
http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Stephan_Smith

Learning to draw is a gradual process, and like any skill, everyone makes mistakes along the way. Unfortunately, drawing is often self-taught, which means you continue making mistakes much longer than when a teacher is available to point you in the right direction. Here are the 10 most common mistakes beginners make when they learn to draw. Some big, some small, all fixable. Check and see whether these errors crop up in your drawings, and get some tips on fixing them.

1. Drawing With a Hard Pencil.
If you have no very dark shadows and the whole picture is rather pale, check your pencil. Are you using a Number2 (HB) pencil? These are too hard to draw with (though they are handy for light shading). Get a B, 2B and 4B for darker values. Read more about pencil grades.

2. Portraits from Flash Photography.
This is the major cause of beginner drawing problems. Using flash photography flattens the features, giving you nothing to work with. When the person is facing you, it is very hard to see the modeling of the face, as the perspective vanishes behind their head, and add a cheesy snapshot grin and you make life very hard! Have the person turning slightly to one side so you can model their face, with natural lighting to give good skintones, and a natural expression to show their real personality.
3. Incorrect Head Proportions.
Because of the way we focus on a person's features, we usually draw them too big and squash the rest of the head. Learn about the correct head proportions

4. Twisted Features.
Because we are used to looking at a person straight-on, we naturally try to make their features look level when we draw them. If their head is on an angle, this results in strange distortions in the picture. Sketch guidelines first to ensure that the features are on the same angle as the rest of the face.

5. Pet Drawings from Human Eye Level
When you take a photograph standing up, you are looking down at your pet. They have to look up, and you end up with their head seeming much bigger than their body, and a rather odd expression on their face. Have someone distract them so they aren't staring down the lens, and squat down so the camera is at their head level, and you'll get a much better reference photo.

6. Being Afraid of Black.
Often when shading, the shadows don't go past dark gray. If your value range is restricted to in some cases half what it ought to be, you are limiting the modelling and depth in your drawing. Put a piece of black paper at the corner of your drawing, and don't be afraid to go dark. Really dark. Improve your range of tone.

7. Outlining in Value Drawings
When value drawing, you are creating an illusion with areas of tonal value. When you use a hard drawn line to define an edge, you disrupt this illusion. Let edges be defined by two different areas of tonal value meeting. Read more about Value Drawing.

8. Drawing on the Wrong Paper.
If your drawing is pale, it might be the paper. Some cheap papers have a sheen on the surface that is too smooth to grab the particles off the pencil. A thick notepad has too much 'give' under the pencil to allow you to apply enough pressure. Try a basic photocopy/office paper, or check the art store for cheap sketch paper. Place a piece of card under a couple of sheets to give a firmer surface. If you are trying to do even shading, some sketch papers can be too coarse, giving an uneven texture. Try a hot-pressed Bristol board or similar smooth drawing paper. Find out more about paper

9. Scribbled Foliage
Don't use circular scribbles to draw foliage. Use more convex shaped scumbling - like crescent shapes and scribbly calligraphic marks - to draw the shadows in and around clusters of foliage, and your trees will look much more realistic.

10. Wiry, Pencil-Line Hair and Grass
If you draw every hair or blade of grass as a pencil line, you'll end up with a horrible, wiry, unnatural mess. Use feathery pencil-strokes to draw the shadows and dark foliage behind areas of grass - just like drawing short hair in this drawing hair tutorial.




Click here to get The Blog Profits Blueprint


How to Become A Professional Artist and Get Paid for Drawing.

Click Here!

Figure Drawing Secrets. How To Draw Figures And People For Any Artists.

Click Here!

Art Lessons - How To Draw Faces, Paint Realistically, And Do Calligraphy - Presented By Bennecelli, The Acclaimed Artist!

Click Here!

Tuesday, July 3, 2007

New Writers Needed

We’re looking for more new writers for our Blogging Network. If you love writing or blogging, I’d like to chat with you.

A couple notes:
• Please send me a writing sample.
• Experience blogging isn’t required, I will train you.
• Some positions are paid, and some aren’t. Please specify in your email whether or not you’ll work for free.

Send an email to williamcoit@yahoo.com .

How to Draw A Dragon

Introduction
Dragons are cool. You know that, that's why you want to draw one. Luckily, it's a lot easier than it looks. Grab a pencil and let's draw a dragon.


Steps
1Step One
Draw a right triangle. Make it big with the right angle in the top right. Make the left side a little longer than the right side and have the hypotenuse (longest side) facing downwards. Don't go all the way to the edge of the page, have the triangle centered in the page. This is his face.

2Step Two
Draw a lower jaw. Simply add another obtuse triangle attached to the bottom of the face. It should share a point with your right triangle, the point on the right where the hypotenuse and the shorter line meet. The longest line of your obtuse triangle should be on the bottom.

3Step Three
Draw the nose. This will be a tiny little equilateral triangle near the end, but not touching the tip of the big right triangle.

4Step Four
Draw an ear. Make this a pointy triangle on the right side of the right triangle. You should have a triangle on each side of your original triangle now. You should be able to make out the shape of your dragon.

5Step Five
Draw an eye. Start with a semicircle inside the big triangle, about an inch away from the ear. Now put a slit for the eye, down the middle of the semicircle. To complete the eye, draw a straight line to close off the semicircle.

6Step Six
Add a ridge in the face. This is hard to explain, but it will look cool. From the top of the eye, draw a very shallow curve with the open side facing upwards. Make your curve stretch all the way to just under the nose.

7Step Seven
Add a nostril. Simply draw a circle at the end of your face ridge.

8Step Eight
Add a ridge above the eye. This will just be a slight bump on the triangle right above the eye.

9Step Nine
Give him some teeth, triangles, of course, inside the mouth. Two jagged ones on the top are fine, but if you think he needs more feel free to deck him out with hundreds of flesh-tearing fangs.

10Step Ten
Draw his neck. This should be one simple curve from just below the ear. Make it almost a semicircle. The second curve will be more S-shaped and will start from the bottom of his jaw.

11Step Eleven
Add some triangles along the back of his head. Make them in line with the ear but smaller. This is like a triceratops face with a collar of spikes.

12Step Twelve
Draw flames. That is, if your dragon breathes fire (not all do). These are wavy lines coming from the mouth.

13Step Thirteen
You're done! Well, almost. If you are an advanced artist, you can go back and round out some of the triangles and make it seem more realistic. You can also add shading. Add scales on the neck and make his eye more detailed.


Click here to get The Blog Profits Blueprint


How to Become A Professional Artist and Get Paid for Drawing.

Click Here!

Figure Drawing Secrets. How To Draw Figures And People For Any Artists.

Click Here!

Art Lessons - How To Draw Faces, Paint Realistically, And Do Calligraphy - Presented By Bennecelli, The Acclaimed Artist!

Click Here!

How to Draw A Car

Step by step instructions on how to draw a car. Click Below

http://www.cartooncritters.com/drawcar.htm



Link to article on How To Draw
http://www.ehow.com/how_2032597_draw.html


Click here to get The Blog Profits Blueprint


How to Become A Professional Artist and Get Paid for Drawing.

Click Here!

Figure Drawing Secrets. How To Draw Figures And People For Any Artists.

Click Here!

Art Lessons - How To Draw Faces, Paint Realistically, And Do Calligraphy - Presented By Bennecelli, The Acclaimed Artist!

Click Here!

How To Draw Anime Style Art

If you're an anime fan, and you're interested in learning how to draw like those artists we love so much, you're not alone. No one can magically give you the skills you need to draw, but at least we can give you some pointers. We have some basic tutorials on anime (or manga) style art from two different artists; work through both and see what works for you! Click Below to Continue
http://animeworld.com/howtodraw/index.html


Step By Step Instructions - How To Draw Anime
http://www.ehow.com/how_156225_draw-anime.html



Click here to get The Blog Profits Blueprint


How to Become A Professional Artist and Get Paid for Drawing.

Click Here!

Figure Drawing Secrets. How To Draw Figures And People For Any Artists.

Click Here!

Art Lessons - How To Draw Faces, Paint Realistically, And Do Calligraphy - Presented By Bennecelli, The Acclaimed Artist!

Click Here!

 

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